NYC & Company Announces Key Events to Celebrate Year of Pride

NYC & Company Announces Key Events to Celebrate Year of Pride

Group of People Waving Gay Pride Flags

WHY IT RATES: Travel agents and advisors with clients visiting New York City should be ready to experience the many Pride events scheduled this year.—Donald Wood, Breaking News Senior Writer.


NYC & Company, New York City’s official destination marketing organization, has declared 2019 as the Year of Pride. NYC is the leading LGBTQ destination in the US year after year and welcomes visitors of all genders, all ages and from all parts of the US and the world.

NYC is offering a collection of Pride activities and events to enjoy before, after and during WorldPride and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising in June, a pivotal moment in LGBTQ history.

“We have declared 2019 the Year of Pride, to not only celebrate WorldPride and Stonewall 50 but to acknowledge the perpetual spirit of New York City’s vibrant LGBTQ community,” said Fred Dixon, president and CEO of NYC & Company. “In addition to the iconic events in June, the City is brimming with a yearlong roster of cultural activity.”

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WorldPride will take place in NYC—the first time the global event will be held in the US—from June 25–30, with an anticipated 4 million visitors. On June 28, 1969, riots broke out in response to a police raid at the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, which is now the country’s first national monument dedicated to LGBTQ rights. This June and throughout 2019, NYC celebrates Pride. Below is a sampling of exhibitions, activities and events throughout the year that embody NYC’s welcoming spirit.

Arts & Culture:

Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again – through March 31

The Whitney Museum of American Art

Last chance to see the first comprehensive retrospective of Warhol’s work organized by an American institution since 1989, and the largest monographic exhibition to date at the Whitney’s new location.

Love & Resistance: Stonewall 50 – through July 14

New York Public Library, Bryant Park, Manhattan

Explore the emergence of the LGBTQ civil rights movement during the 1960s and ’70s through photographs from pioneering journalists Tobin Lahusen and Diana Davies, that sit alongside the library’s vast archives from LGBTQ history.

Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now – through January 5, 2020

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

This multiphase retrospective features Robert Mapplethorpe’s collages and photographs, as well as the work of contemporary artists who reference the artist.

On the (Queer) Waterfront – March 5 through July 7

Brooklyn Historical Society, Brooklyn

Learn about the largely forgotten LGBTQ communities that thrived along Brooklyn’s waterfront in the 1800s and through WWII, highlighting both the changes and continuities in the ideas and experiences of sexuality in Brooklyn.

Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern – March 17 through June 15

Museum of Modern Art & PS1, Manhattan & Queens

Best known for establishing the New York City Ballet, Kirstein was also a key figure in MoMA’s early history. Bringing together some 300 rare artworks alongside materials drawn from the museum’s archives, the exhibition illuminates Kirstein’s influence on MoMA’s collecting, exhibition and publication history, and his position at the center of a New York network of queer artists, intimates and collaborators.

Art After Stonewall, 1969–1989

NYU’s Grey Art Gallery, Manhattan – April 24 through July 20

Leslie-Lohman Museum, Manhattan – April 24 through July 21

Presented in two parts, this will be the first major exhibition to highlight the impact of the LGBTQ civil rights movement on the art world. Over 150 works of art and materials from artists including Nan Goldin, Holly Hughes, Robert Mapplethorpe, Tim Miller, Catherine Opie and Andy Warhol will be on view, paired with that of artists who interacted with queer subculture.

Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall – May 3 through December 8

Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn

Borrowing its title from the rallying words of transgender artist and activist Marsha P. Johnson, Nobody Promised You Tomorrow aims to expand understanding of the Stonewall Uprising beyond the image of protesters in the streets to consider the everyday acts that reinforce such public activism.

Camp: Notes on Fashion – May 9 through September 8

The Met Fifth Avenue, Manhattan

The Costume Institute’s spring 2019 exhibition will explore the origins of the camp aesthetic featuring nearly 200 objects, including womenswear and menswear, as well as sculptures, paintings and drawings dating from the 17th century to the present. The exhibition is inspired by writer Susan Sontag’s 1964 essay “Notes on Camp.”

Stonewall 50 Exhibitions – May 24 through September 22

New-York Historical Society, Manhattan

Letting Loose and Fighting Back: LGBTQ Nightlife Before and After Stonewall will explore the history of LGBTQ bars, clubs and nightlife in NYC during the second half of the 20th century. By the Force of Our Presence: Highlights from the Lesbian Herstory Archives will examine lesbian lives both pre- and post-Stonewall. Special graphic installation, Say It Loud, Out and Proud: Fifty Years of Pride, will feature imagery from five decades of NYC Pride marches.

Music of Conscience Series – May 30 and June 1

New York Philharmonic, Manhattan

Experience John Corigliano’s Symphony No. 1, the New York composer’s “personal response to the AIDS crisis,” inspired by the AIDS Memorial Quilt. The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center created its own Quilt Project, and a portion of that quilt—inscribed by visitors to Central Park in June 1988—will be on display in the lobby of David Geffen Hall.

PRIDE – June 6 through November

Museum of the City of New York, Manhattan

Examine NYC through the lens of photographer Fred W. McDarrah, who created an encyclopedic archive of culture and politics for The Village Voice; from the Beats of the 1950s to the counterculture of the ’60s to the Stonewall Uprising and major political events of the early 1970s. The exhibition features images of cultural icons such as Allen Ginsberg and Bob Dylan, with attention to gay liberation, anti–Vietnam War marches and the women’s movement.

Walt Whitman: Bard of Democracy – June 7 through September 15

The Morgan Library & Museum

Experience Whitman’s writing that earned him a global audience, including “O Captain! My Captain!” Additionally, view documents from Oscar Wilde, Hart Crane, Federico García Lorca and Allen Ginsberg, which trace the writer’s influence on the 20th century.

Pride Auction – June 20

Swann Auction Galleries

A unique and landmark event, featuring work from artists and writers including James Baldwin, Tom of Finland, Gertrude Stein, Alice Walker, Robert Mapplethorpe and more.

NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project – Year-round

Citywide

The recently launched project is the first initiative to document historic and cultural sites associated with the LGBTQ community in all five boroughs. Sites illustrate the richness of the City’s LGBTQ history and the community’s influence on America.

Alice Austen House Museum – Year-round

Staten Island

Take the free Staten Island ferry to visit the Alice Austen House, named by the National Register of Historic Places as the “national site of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) history.” Austen was a turn-of-the-century lesbian photographer who lived with her female companion for many years in her home that boasts views of the Manhattan skyline.

Lesbian Herstory Archives – Year-round

Brooklyn

View the largest collection of materials by and about lesbians and their communities. Part library, part museum, the LHA is a communal place to browse photographs or files, read a book, watch a video, listen to a CD or LP, do research or volunteer. Group tours can also be arranged.

50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising – Year-round

The Jewish Museum, Manhattan

The museum will pay tribute through a year of programming, while highlighting LGBTQ works of art from the museum’s collection that explore themes of gender and identity.

Borough Parades:

Staten Island PrideFest – May 10–19

PrideFest will celebrate 15 years with a full week of events in May, including a 5K fun run, a Sober Coffee House and a Youth Prom. The week ends with an afternoon festival at Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Garden featuring live music, drag performers, food trucks and craft vendors.

Harlem Pride – May 31 through June 29

The 10th anniversary of Harlem Pride in 2019 is also the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance. The monthlong celebrations will consist of performances, discussions and ceremonies at iconic locations including the Apollo Theater.

Queens Pride – June 2

Pride month kicks off in the heart of Queens with this annual parade down 27th Avenue in Jackson Heights, followed by an afternoon street festival in the neighborhood that features music, drag performances and local cuisine.

Brooklyn Twilight Pride Parade – June 8

Brooklyn puts its own twist on Pride with a nontraditional march starting at dusk through the streets of Park Slope. Following the march, a Pride street fair will take place with food, crafts and entertainment.

1 Bronx Festival – June 23

The march will take place preceding the annual 1 Bronx Festival that promotes inclusion, community and dialogue. Pride events throughout the festival inspire, educate and celebrate the diverse Bronx community.

Furthermore, visit New York City’s historic LGBTQ landmarks, including: Bethesda Fountain; Christopher Park; Julius; The Langston Hughes House; The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center; The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art; New York City AIDS Memorial; Stonewall Inn.

For more information on NYC’s Year of Pride celebrations, visit nycgo.com/year-of-pride


SOURCE: NYC & Company press release.

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